Meet the 2019 S2S Network Team!

As a way of introducing themselves, we asked our returning mentor and our new workshop facilitators to answer three questions. Read on to get familiar with the faces you will see when you participate in this year's workshop series!

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Mentor: Josh McGonegal
Diagosis: Medulloblastoma

Q: What's going on in your life right now?
A: I am currently pursuing a BSW in social work at Laurentian University and am in my fourth year of the program. On top of volunteering as the mentor of the S2S Network, I am also the volunteer facilitator of the Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada's East Virtual Support Group.

Q: What is something you take pride in?
A: An area of my life that I take pride in is my school work. I am proud of the fact that I have been on the Dean's Honour Role for all three years I have been enrolled at Laurentian University.

Q: Why do you think survivors should attend S2S workshops?
A: I think survivors should attend S2S workshops because for me there is nothing as powerful as being in the same room with others who have been through similar experiences and can share their journeys, especially as they concern topics relevant to survivorship.

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Facilitator: Abdullah Al-Haddad
Diagnosis: Osteosarcoma and retinoblastoma

Q: What's going on in your life right now?
A: I'm a second-year social work student and working part-time.

Q: What is something you take pride in?
A: Community involvement.

Q: Why do you think survivors should attend the S2S workshops?
A: It's a great way to meet like-minded individuals.

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Facilitator: Marissa Kirton
Diagnosis: Abdominal ovarian cancer metastasized to lungs

Q: What's going on in your life right now?
A: I am now 26 years old and a graduate of Seneca College's  Medical Administration program. Over time, I have volunteered for many different youth organizations, like YAN, for different events, including things at my school. I am currently employed full-time for Scotiabank collections, until I find employment within my field of medical administration.

Q: What is something you take pride in?
A: The one thing I take the most pride in is being a kind and good person to others because at the end of the day kindness will make the world go round, generations after generations.

Q: Why do you think survivors should attend the S2S workshops?
A: This work is an amazing idea. I wish I had this through my teenage years as a chance to speak to people who are actually going through or have gone through my experience. Just that feeling of knowing you are not alone can help in every way. As we continue with workshops, I hope that I can be a face of encouragement to keep fighting, loving and conquering life because we will never let cancer win!!!!

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Facilitator: Michelle Nedvetski
Diagnosis: Medulloblastoma

Q: What's going on in your life right now?
A: I am currently a student at York University, majoring in biology and in the concurrent program to receive a teaching degree.

Q: What is something you take pride in?
A: I take pride in the fact that I am a positive person and am able to always make my friends laugh.

Q: Why do you think survivors should attend the S2S workshops?
A: Survivors should attend the S2S workshops because it's a great experience to meet other survivors, to share stories and learn more about how to achieve your goals in the future, whether it has to do with education, careers or just accessible opportunities.

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Facilitator: Nicole Waddell-Moreno
Diagnosis: Germinoma

Q: What's going on in your life right now?
A: These days I've been working part-time for a sampling company, as well as caring for my two dogs and taking singing lessons. I also have a grandma with Alzheimer's and watch over her. I'm also looking into schools for college education.

Q: What is something you take pride in?
A: I take pride in that with all that life has thrown at me, I'm able to help others and to be a source of inspiration just by sharing my story.

Q: Why do you think survivors should attend S2S workshops?
A: I was also diagnosed with depression and anxiety, and was bullied by my peers at school and a family member. If I had the S2S program when I was in treatment, I would have really benefited from it. Yes, having cancer is hard but it's things after the treatment that is usually overlooked, such as bullies, loneliness and having to build relationships over again. And no one understands what a survivor has to go through quite like a survivor.

 

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